District Profile

General Characteristics Of The District
Ahmednagar district, which is known to be the ‘Place of Saints’, is located between Pune and Aurangabad on road line and between Manmad and Daund on railway line. It is the largest district in area in Maharashtra comprising 14 taluka places. Ahmednagar district is on the fore-front in co-operative movement in the country owing to the strong presence of Sugar factories, distilleries, spinning mills, paper mills, milk federation, dairy etc. in the co-operative sector and a few co-operative industrial estates. The district has well road network connecting it to all the mega markets in the country. It can be said that the districtis the ‘Gateway’ of Marathwada and Vidarbha to Mumbai. The north belt of the b district is richer in water resources with the help of Godavari and Pravara riversand south belt is dry land except few spots in Shrirampur and Parner.
Location & Geographical Area:
Ahmednagar district popularly known as ‘Nagar’ is one of the important districts of Western Maharashtra, which is situated partly in upper Godavari basin and partly in the Bhima basin. It lies between 18.2 0 to 19.9 0 north latitude and 73.9 0 to 57.5 0 East longitude. It is bounded on the north by Nashik district, on the north-east by Aurangabad district, on the north by Beed and Osmanabad districts, on the south by Solapur district and in the west by Pune and Thane district. The total geographical area of Ahmednagar district is 1667 thousand
hectors which is 5.53% of the total State Area. Climate:
The climate of this district is characterized by a hot summer and general dryness during major part of the year, except during south west monsoon, when the relative humidity is between 60 to 80 percent, thereafter it decreases rapidly. Ahmednagar district is away from the sea. The climate of the district is hot and dry, on whole extremely genial and is characterized by a hot summer and general dryness during major part of the year except during south-west monsoon season. In the hilly western part of the district, the climate is slightly cool. Bhandardara is hill station in the Akole taluka. In the cold season which lasts from November to February the air is dry and invigorating. The period from March to the first week of June is the hot season. It is followed by the south- west monsoon season which lasts till the end of September. October and November constitute the post-monsoon or the retreating south-west monsoon season. The western hilly region receives more rainfall, but as one goes towards the east, the amount of rainfall decreases
Rain Fall:
Ahmednagar district gets rainfall mainly from south west monsoon but the distribution of rain is mostly uneven. Agro climatically, the district falls in drought prone area. The average rainfall of the district is between 500 to 550 mm. The average rainfall of Akola and Sangamner talukas are high as compare to other talukas.
Soil:
The entire district is occupied by basaltic lava flows, which are popularly known as ‘Deccan Traps’. These lava flows are sometimes associated with inter trapper beds such as limestone, clay, shale, red bole beds, porouash thin mantle of black cotton soil present almost everywhere on the basalts. River alluvial sand, carvel, clays and silts represent the recent deposits in the district. Calcareous concernations and Nodules known as Kankar is commonly
associated with the soil. The soil types of the district are broadly divided into four categories namely coarse shallow soil; medium black soil; deep black soil and reddish soil occupying about 38, 41, 13 and 8 percent of the cultivated area respectively. In the first two categories, soil moisture is the predominant limiting factor affecting productivity of crops particularly under rainfed condition .
Rivers:
Godavari and Bhima are the major rivers of the district. The Pravara is the tributary of Godavari. The Mula, the Adhale and the Mahalungi are the important tributaries of the Pravara. The southern part of the district consisting of Parner, Ahmednagar, Pathardi, Shrigaonda and Karjat tehsils constitutes the Bhima basin with the tributaries Kukadi and Ghod
Availability of Minerals:
Minerals of economic value are not found in the district. Mud used for making bricks, sand and metal stone used for construction purpose are the only important minerals found in Ahmednagar district. Forest:
The total area under the forest is 132 thousand hectares which is 9.85% of the total geographical area of the district. Akole taluka have the maximum forest areas in the district. The forest produce includes Hirda, Custard apple, fuel wood, grass, gum and tendu leaves. The National Waste Land Development board and Social Forestry Department provides full technical and financial support for development of community and private waste land. The department of Forestry takes care of the forest land development and its maintenance. Places like Bhandardara Dam in Akole taluka, Chand Bibi’s Mahal in Ahmednagar Taluka, Rehekuri Blackbuck sanctuary in Karjat taluka and Kalsubai Harishchandragad Sanctuarary in Akole taluka can be developed as tourist place. There is a need to increase the forest area in the district.
Population 2011
In 2011, Ahmadnagar had population of 4,543,083 of which male and female were 2,348,802 and 2,194,281 respectively. In 2001 census, Ahmadnagar had a population of 4,040,642 of which males were 2,083,053 and remaining 1,957,589 were females. Ahmadnagar District population constituted 4.04 percent of total Maharashtra population. In 2001 census, this figure for Ahmadnagar District was at 4.17 percent of Maharashtra population. Population Growth Rate There was change of 12.43 percent in the population compared to population as per 2001. In the previous census of India 2001, Ahmadnagar District recorded increase of 19.80 percent to its population compared to 1991. Population Density 2011 The initial provisional data released by census India 2011, shows that density of Ahmadnagar district for 2011 is 266 people per sq. km. In 2001, Ahmadnagar district density was at 237 people per sq. km. Ahmadnagar district administers 17,048 square kilometers of areas. Literacy Rate 2011 Average literacy rate of Ahmadnagar in 2011 were 80.22 compared to 75.30 of 2001. If things are looked out at gender wise, male and female literacy were 88.81 and 71.15 respectively. For 2001 census, same figures stood at 85.70 and 64.35 in Ahmadnagar District. Total literate in Ahmadnagar District were 3,213,330 of which male and female were 1,826,412 and 1,386,918 respectively. In 2001, Ahmadnagar District had 2,598,597 in its district. Sex Ratio 2011 With regards to Sex Ratio in Ahmadnagar, it stood at 934 per 1000 male compared to 2001 census figure of 940. The average national sex ratio in India is 940 as per latest reports of Census 2011 Directorate. In 2011 census, child sex ratio is 839 girls per 1000 boys compared to figure of 884 girls per 1000 boys of 2001 census data.
Child Population 2011
In census enumeration, data regarding child under 0-6 age were also collected for all districts including Ahmadnagar. There were total 537,346 children under age of 0-6 against 589,706 of 2001 census. Of total 537,346 male and female were 292,242 and 245,104 respectively. Child Sex Ratio as per census 2011 was 839 compared to 884 of census 2001. In 2011, Children under 0-6 formed 11.83 percent of Ahmadnagar District compared to 14.59 percent of 2001. There was net change of -2.76 percent in this compared to previous census of India.
Urban Population 2011
Out of the total Ahmadnagar population for 2011 census, 20.10 percent lives in urban regions of district. In total 913,071 people lives in urban areas of which males are 471,697 and females are 441,374. Sex Ratio in urban region of Ahmadnagar district is 936 as per 2011 census data. Similarly child sex ratio in Ahmadnagar district was 848 in 2011 census. Child population (0-6) in urban region was 101,484 of which males and females were 54,915 and 46,569. This child population figure of Ahmadnagar district is 11.64 % of total urban population. Average literacy rate in Ahmadnagar district as per census 2011 is 88.79 % of which males and females are 93.84 % and 83.47 % literates respectively. In actual number 720,640 people are literate in urban region of which males and females are 391,097 and 329,543 respectively.
Rural Population 2011
As per 2011 census, 79.90 % population of Ahmadnagar districts lives in rural areas of villages. The total Ahmadnagar district population living in rural areas is 3,630,012 of which males and females are 1,877,105 and 1,752,907 respectively. In rural areas of Ahmadnagar district, sex ratio is 934 females per 1000 males. If child sex ratio data of Ahmadnagar district is considered, figure is 837 girls per 1000 boys. Child population in the age 0-6 is 435,862 in rural areas of which males were 237,327 and females were 198,535. The child population comprises 12.64 % of total rural population of Ahmadnagar district. Literacy rate in rural areas of Ahmadnagar district is 78.04 % as per census data 2011. Gender wise, male and female literacy stood at 87.53 and 68.03 percent respectively. In total, 2,492,690 people were literate of which males and females were 1,435,315 and 1,057,375 respectively. Agricultural and allied census
Ahmadnagar is the biggest district of Maharashtra in terms of area and population. The total geographical area of the district is 17.41 lakh ha. The net cropped area is 12, 56,500 ha, out of which an area of 3, 30,000 ha. (26.27 %) is under canal (84,000 ha) and well irrigation. About 9, 26,500 ha. (73.73 %) area is rain fed. The area under Kharif crops is 4, 60,000 ha. (36.6 per cent) while 7, 58,000 ha (60.32 per cent) area is under Rabi crops. A multiple copping system is followed on 1, 10,500 ha. area. A total of 8.73 per cent area of the district is under forest.
Land Holding

Sr.No Land Holding No. of land holder Area(Ha)
1 Up to 1.00 ha 239151 127900
2 1.00 to 1.99 ha       213899 312445
3 2.00 to 3.99 ha 157906 423553
4 4.00 to 9.99 ha 61517 352165
5 Above 10 ha 8136 131259
Total 680609 1356322

Water Resources
On an average 32.27 percent of the cultivated area is under irrigation, out of which 71.46 percent is under well irrigation (including lift irrigation) and remaining area is under canal irrigation. In the northern part of the district there are 3 major irrigation projects namely upper Godavari, Pravara and Mula having 2, 18 and 28 percent of the irrigated areas. In the south- western part of the district there are two command projects (namely Ghod & Kukadi) which are having 15 percent of the irrigated area. Besides this, there are 7 medium projects and 90 minor projects covering 16 and 5 percent of the total irrigated areas.
Irrigation
For the development of agricultural sector wells, tanks and rivers are used for the purpose of irrigation in Ahmadnagar district. Shrirampur, Ahmadnagar, Pathardi, Karjat, Parner, Sangamner, Kopergaon and Rahata talukas have a large number of wells than in other talukas. There are lakes at Visapur, Bhatodi, Musalvadi and Gunvadi in Ahmadnagar district. Bhandardara dam in Akola taluka constructed on Pravara River, which irrigated the land of Rahata, Shrirampur, Rahuri and Sangamner talukas. Baragaon Nandur dam in Rahuri taluka on Mula River irrigated the land of Rahuri, Newasa and Shevgaon talukas. Devthana dam on the river Adhala, Mandohal dam in Parner taluka and Pargaon Ghatsheel dam in Pathardi taluka are some of other dams in the district. Other sources of the irrigation in the district are percolation tanks and lift irrigation schemes. Kukadi dam of Pune district also irrigated to Parner and Shrigonda taluka.

Development of Irrigation Sources in Ahmadnagar District.

Sr.No Particulars No. of projects

 

Irrigation Potential in Thousand Hectors
1 Major Projects 02 92 (19.83%)
2 Medium Projects 07 66 (14.23%)
3 Minor Projects 107 53 (11.42%)
4 Other Sources 253 (54.52%)
5 Total 116 464(100.00%)

Area, Production and Productivity of major crops cultivated in the district

S. NO CROP AREA (HA)

 

PRODUCTION (Q) PRODUCTIVITY (Q /HA)
A Cereals
Bajara 190000 2019700 10.63
Rabi Jowar 486000 1365660 2.81
Wheat 120000 2280000 19.00
B Oilseed
Soybean 55000 874500 15.90
Groundnut 3700 23051 6.23
Sunflower 4200 16590 3.95
C Pulses
Bengalgram 107000 342400 3.20
Red gram 17600 78848 4.48
Green gram 18800 71440 3.78
D Cash Crops
Sugarcane 128000 9088000 Ton. 71 Ton/ha
Cotton 110000 398200 3.62
Sr.No Horticulture Crops Area(Ha) Ton T/Ha
1 Mango 3251 32510 10.0
2 Sapota 3092 16078.4 5.2
3 Sweet Orange 600 4200 7.0
4 Pomegranate 6093 30465 5.0
5 Aonla 500 4000 8.0
6 Custard apple 1200 2400 2.0
7 Guava 2000 10000 5.0
8 Grape 800 6400 8.0
9 Lime 3200 8000 2.5
10 Banana 300 10500 35.0
11 Fig 150 300 2.0
B) Vegetables
1 Onion 65000 9750000 150
2 Potato 1115 111500 100
3 Tomato 2200 330000 150
4 Brinjal 1400 140000 100
5 Okra 1000 600000 600
6 Chili 1800 90000 50
7

 

Cabbage/ Cauliflower 790 118500

 

150

 

8 Peas 222 8880 40
9 Other leafy vegetables 1100 88000 80
C) Flowers 3,112.00 31120 10

Production and productivity of livestock, Poultry, Fisheries etc. in the district

Category Population Production Productivity
Cattle      
Crossbred 467007 3435.35 lakh kg 6.57 kg/day/cow
Indigenous 380450 526.91 lakh kg 1.9 kg/day/cow
Buffalo 173783 1647.53 lakh kg 4.52 kg/day/cow
Sheep 452276 205.245 Mt 557 gram wool /year/sheep
Goats 134369 168.81 lakh kg milk 0.175 kg milk /day / goat
Pigs 7689
Rabbits 682
poultry 1112209
Emu 409

Agro-climatic zones
Ahmadnagar district is mainly recognized as multidimensional situation. District is divided into three agro climatic zones viz. Scarcity Zone, Plain (Transition) zone and Ghat (Hilly) zone
A) Scarcity zone This zone is occupied the whole district except one block i.e. Akole, the remaining 13 blocks are under this zone. The average rainfall of this zone ranges from 500 to 700 mm received in 40 to 45 days. About 70-80per cent of annual rainfall is received during monsoon period (June to September). Soil varies from reddish brown to dark gray and commonly grouped as light to medium black soil. In very few places deep black soil is also observed. Erratic nature of rainfall affects the moisture content in the soil, therefore, this zone is commonly known as drought prone area . Cropping pattern : Major crops grown in this zone are pearl millet, sorghum, safflower, Bengal gram, wheat, sugarcane etc. B) Plain (Transition) Zone This zone is confined only to eastern part of Akole block. Geographically this zone has only 4% of the district area. The rainfall in this zone is 700 to 1250 mm annually which is well distributed. Soils are grayish black with varying texture and depth. Cropping pattern : The main crops grown in this region are pearl millet, green gram, benegal gram and wheat. Due to irrigation facility, farmers are growing. Vegetables like tomato, gourds and fruit crops like pomegranate, mango and Sugarcane C) Ghat (Hilly) Zone This zone is situated in northwestern part of the district in western part of Akole block. Geographically this zone has only 4% of the district area. The rainfall in this zone is very high which ranges from 1500 to 3000 mm. The land is mostly covered with forest and sometimes acidic in nature having poor fertility with low phosphorus and potash contents. Cropping pattern : About 50 percent of the geographical area of this zone is under forest, the crops taken in Kharif season are Paddy, Ragi, groundnut, pulses and Niger. The vegetables are also grown in paddy terraces on residual moisture. 4. Agro Ecological Situations (AES) On the basis of soil types and sources of irrigation, the district has been categorized into eight Agro Ecological Situations viz. assured and unassured irrigation system in command area with medium and light soil and the rainfed area with black cotton, medium As well as light soils . The existing farming systems being adopted by majority of farmers in rainfed area of district are characterizes by existence of food grain crops including mostly Bajra, Jowar as cereals and Mung, Udid, and Tur as pulse crops in combination with dairy and animal husbandry. The analysis of the farming systems in command areas indicates the dominance of sugarcane as a cash crop with dairy as an inseparable combination and it is being supplemented by either vegetables and food grain crops or horticultural crops.
Major and micro-farming systems

S. NO Farming System/Enterprise Characteristics
1

 

Mixed farming system with Semi arid Rainfed situation Cotton –Poultry Very low rainfall, plain topography Cotton ,Coarse cereals, lie bajara, Jowar, irrigated cereals, legumes, Onion off-farm activities, Livestock, backyard Poultry, goatery
2

 

Sugarcane-Horticulture- Dairy based Cannel Irrigated farming system Low rainfall, Medium to light soils with Plain topography Irrigated cropping, Sugarcane, Onion, Cotton Livestock,
3 Sugarcane-Horticulture- Dairy based River Irrigated farming system Low rainfall, Medium to light soils with Plain topography ,Irrigated cropping, Livestock
4 Horticulture Dairy based Farming system Pomegranate, Grape, Lime, Mango, Guava, Low rainfall, Medium to light soils with Plain topography
5 Rice based farming system Paddy- Ground nut

 

High Rainfall, Lateritic sloppy soils .Main crops- rice/ragi/ kodra & other cereals Rabi     jowar, Spices, Vegetable

Administrative set up:
Ahmednagar district has 14 tehsils viz. Ahmednagar, Akole, Jamkhed, Karjat, Kopergaon, Newasa, Parner, Pathardi, Rahuri, Sangmner, Shevgaon, Shrirampur, Shrigonda and Rahata. There are 14 Panchayat Samities, 18 cities, 1581 villages, 1 Mahanagar Palika, 8 Nagar Parishads and 1311 Gram Panchayats.
At the district level, Collector is the administrative Chief and at tehsil level, Tehsildars are looking after the administration as per Collector’s instructions. For rural development, Chief Executive Officer of Zilla Parishad and at block level, Block Development Officers are incharge of the administration. Municipal Councils are responsible for urban development of all the tehsils.
Ahmednagar district has 4 sub-divisions as mentioned below:
(A) Ahmednagar:
i) Ahmednagar
ii) Parner
iii) Shevgaon
iv) Pathardi
(B) Karjat:
i) Karjat
ii) Shrigonda
iii) Jamkhed
(C) Shrirampur:
i) Shrirampur
ii) Newasa
iii) Rahuri
iv) Rahata
(D) Sangamner:
i) Sangamner
ii) Kopergaon
iii) Akole
District at a glance

Sr. No. Particulars Year Unit Ahmednagar
1 Area

a)Geographical Area

b)Forest Area

 

 

Sq. Km.

 

Th. Hect.

 

 

17020

 

132

2.Population

a) Rural

b) Urban

c) Total

c) Density

 

In ‘000’s

In ‘000’s

In ‘000’s

Per Sq. Km.

 

3630

913

4543

266

3 Administrative Set Up 2011-12
a) Tehsils Nos. 14
b) Panchayat Samities Nos. 14
c) Cities Nos. 18
d) Villages Nos. 1581
e) Area Sq.Km. 17020
f) Mahanagar Palika Nos. 1
g) Nagar Parishad Nos. 8
h) Gram Panchayat Nos. 1311
4 Rate of Literacy 2011 Percentage 80.22
5

 

Roads

a)National Highway

b) State Highway c) District roads d) Village Roads & others

e) Total Road Length

2010-11

 

 

Km.

 

Km.

Km.

Km.

 

Km

 

 

202

 

1661

6073

4941

 

12877

6 Railway Route 2010-11 Km. 197
7 Agriculture 2008-09 “000” Hectares
a) Non-agricultural land 2008-09 “000” Hectares 11
b) Barren uncultivated land 2008-09 “000” Hectares 186
c)

 

Land useful for cultivation, but not cultivated 2008-09 “000” Hectares 29
d)

 

Permanent Pasture growing land 2008-09 “000” Hectares 45.21
e)

 

Land under miscellaneous tree crops 2008-09 “000” Hectares 10
f) Current fallow land 2008-09 “000” Hectares 56
g) Other follow land 2008-09 “000” Hectares 69
h) Area sown more than once 2008-09 “000” Hectares 140
i) Irrigated area 2008-09 “000” Hectares 597
j) Gross cropped area 2008-09 “000” Hectares 1326
9 Communication 2010-11
a) No. of Post Offices 2010-11 Nos. 664
c) No. of Telephone connections 2010-11 Nos. 136388
10 Bank Branches
a) Commercial Banks 2011-12 Nos. 258
b)

 

District Central Co-operative Bank 2011-12 Nos. 282
c)

 

Maharashtra State Co-operative Agricultural Rural Development Bank & RRB 2011-12 Nos. 13
d) Total Banks 2011-12 Nos. 553
11 Education
a) Primary School 2010-11 Nos. 3443
b)

 

Secondary & Higher Secondary School School 2010-11 Nos. 1021
c) Degree Colleges 2010-11 Nos. 41
d) Other Colleges 2010-11 Nos. 60
e)

 

Industrial Training Institutes (Govt) 2010-11 Nos. 13
12 Existing Industrial. Estates. Nos. 5
a Large Scale Units 2011-12 Nos. 45
b Small Units 2011-12 Nos. 1156
c Micro units 2011-12 Nos. 3353

Major agriculture and allied enterprises
Enterprise wise district profile Agriculture, horticulture, animal husbandry and dairying and non-farm activities are the enterprises predominantly existed in the district.
Co-operative Development in the District
The district economy is mainly dependant on co-operative sector. Late Padmashree Dr. Vitthalrao Vikhe Patil started the first co-operative sugar factory in the district at Pravaranagar during the year 1949, which was the first of its kind in the Asian continent. Ahmadnagar is a pioneer district in co-operative development and in upliftment of sugarcane cultivators through the sugar factories. Similarly dairy co-operatives have also developed as a secondary movement for the benefit of the dairy farmers. Fourteen co-operative sugar factories, 9310 co-operative societies, 1281 co-operatives dairy societies and 4 fruit and vegetable co- operative societies are the backbone of the district providing impetus to the rural economy. The irrigation water co-operatives and transports co-operatives are also playing an important role in the district. The problem related to credit inputs and marketing has been addressed to a great extent that has made the farming community free from the clutches of middlemen and private lenders through the dynamic leadership of the co-operative movement
Small Scale Industries Separating gains of rice from husk by pounding, and gathering medicinal plants are the small scale industries in Akole tahsil. Weaving cloth on handlooms and power looms goes on at Ahmadnagar, Pathardi, Sangamner and Kharda. Weaving rough blankets of sheep wool is the small scale industry in Sangamner, Karjat and Pathardi tahsils. Making ropes from agave and ambadi is carried on in Shrigonda tehsil. Bidi rolling is carried on in Ahmadnagar, Akola and Sangamner tahsils. Kopargaon, Rahata, Ahmadnagar and Rahuri are markets for selling jaggery. Jaggery is 224 made in the neighboring areas of these places. There are oil mills at Shrirampur, Sangamner, Ahmadnagar and Vambori.
Large Scale Industries Milk chilling plants are located at Ahmadnagar, Karjat, Kopergaon, Babhaleshwar and Sangamner etc. there is a factory producing „Ayurvedic ‟medicines at Ahmadnagar are manufacturing mopeds and T.V. sets. Pharmaceutical factories are located at Kopergaon and Kanhegaon. Industries making engines and pump-sets are located at Shrirampur. There are spinning mills at Shrirampur, Haregaon and Rahuri. Ginning and pressing industries are also found at Sangamner, Ahmadnagar, Pathardi and Shevgaon. Sugar Industries Ahmadnagar district is called „Sugar Bowl ‟ of Maharashtra. At present 17 co-operative sugar factories are operating with full capacity. Sugar industries are located at Agastinagar, Sangamner, Kolpewadi, Takli, Rahata, Pravaranagar, Karegaon, Rahuri, Bhende, Sonai, Pathardi, Shrigonda, Shevgaon, Bodhegaon, Rashin etc. papermills making paper from sugarcane bagasse are at Sangamner, Rahuri, Kopergaon and Pravaranagar. Maharashtra Industrial Development Corporation (MIDC) At present 634 units are working and they providing employment to 21340 workers. Drillco, Garware Nylon, Kirloskar Oil Engines, L&T, Chakan Oil Mill, Boots India, Trinity Forge,
Crompton Greaves, Kinetic, etc. are the prominent entrepreneur in MIDC area. Industrial estates in the district are located at Ahmadnagar, Shrirampur, Koperagaon and Sangamner. Vehicle Research and Development Establishment (VRDE) – Where all sorts of vehicles are tested, certificated from VRDE is a must for all vehicles manufactured. Mahatma Phule Krishi Vidhypeeth, Rahuri – The University has intended to process and evolve in producing many High Yielding Varieties (HYV) crops of various cereals and pulses. The research carried out by the University is helpful to the agriculturists.
Notable people of Ahmednagar
Sant Dnyaneshwar, Marathi saint, wrote Dnyaneshwari, a discourse on the Bhagavad Gita.
Sai Baba of Shirdi, spiritual master
Anand Rishiji, Jain saint
Meher Baba, spiritual leader
Chand Bibi, Nizamshahi princess,defended Ahmednagar Fort against the Mughal forces of Emperor Akbar
Anna Hazare, Gandhian and social activist
Shahu Modak, film actor
Sadashiv Amrapurkar, noted film and theater actor
Michael J. S. Dewar, theoretical chemist
Anna Leonowens, educator, feminist, author of The English Governess at the Siamese Court (1870)
Pramod Kamble, painter and sculptor
Zaheer Khan, cricketer
Ajinkya Rahane, cricketer
Spike Milligan, 1918-2002, comedian and author
Brief Intro of Important places
Salabat Khan tomb-Six miles from the City on a hill called Shah Dongar, stands the tomb of Salabat khan, visible for miles across the plains which spread 900 feet below the monument. The sepulchral monument is octagonal in shape. Sunlight plays on the tomb thought the day, streaming through slanted apertures in the vault.Sometimes mistakenly referred to as the Mahal of chand bibi by local residents, this in fact the tomb of Salabat KhanII, the famous minister of the fourth Nizam shah, Murtaza who ascended the throne in 1565. A great statesman, Salabat Khan was appointed minister in 1579, after the half-mad Murtaza put to death his regent, Changiz Khan,in a fit of suspicion and rage. Salabat Khan was respected and loved by the people of Ahmednagar
Kot Bagh Nizam–In order to wreak his revenge on the Bahamani king, who had distrusted and sought to destroy him, Ahmed Nizam Shah,as Malik Ahmed now called himself, decided to destroy Daulatabad. He shifted his headquarter from Junnar near Pune ,to Ahmednagar, in order to come within striking distance of Daulatabad which lay 75 miles south-west of Ahmednagar. The foundation of city of Ahmenadgar was laid in 1494 on the left bank of Sina river. In the centre of the city was the Bagh Nizam( the Garden of Victory). In 1499,Malik Ahmed has his revenge. He captured Daulatabad Fort and destroyed the Bahamin kingdom. To commemorate this second victory, he raised a wall around the Bagh Nizam.the Bagh Nizam Later become Ahmednagar Fort.
Faria Bagh Palace-Ahmed Nizam’s son,Burhan Shah, who ascended the throne in 1508 at the age of seven, fortified the NizamShahi dynasty by forming an alliance with the sworn enemy of his father, the powerful Raja of Vijaynagar, whose kingdom lay to the south. This period was characterised by religious tolerance, art & flourishing trade. Skirmishes with the Mughals, Bijapur & various other small states continued through his reign, & Burhan Shah the worrier king, remained ever ready to do the battle. A palace built for Burhan Shah,the second Nizam Stands in ruins, two miles south-east of the city. The Fariabagh Palace rises from lake. It is octagonal structure with a flat- roofed upper story, over a domed central hall. The structure is rough stone, plastered with stucco. Here noblemen played chess & in gardens that once surrounded the lake. Burhan Shah died in 1553 at the age of fifty four & was buried at Karbala.
Ahmednagar Fort – The Ahmednagar Fort is located in the heart of the city of Ahmednagar, It was the headquarters of the Ahmednagar Sultanate. In 1803 it was taken by the British in during the Second Anglo-Maratha War. Later it was used by the British Raj as a prison. Currently the fort is under the administration of the Armoured Corps of the Indian Army.
The fort was built by Malik Shah Ahmed (after whom the city of Ahmednagar is named) in 1427 CE. He was the first sultan of the Nizam Shahi dynasty and he built the fort to defend the city against invaders from neighbouring Idar.Initially it was made of mud but major fortification began in 1559 under Hussain Nizam Shah. It took four years and was finally finished in 1562. In 1596, Chand Bibi the queen regent successfully repulsed the Mughal invasion but when Akbar attacked again in 1600 the fort went to the Mughals.
Aurangzeb died at Ahmednagar fort at the age of 88 on February 20, 1707.After Aurangzeb’s death the fort passed to the Nizams in 1724, to Marathas in 1759 and later the Scindias in 1790. During the period of instability in the Maratha Empire following the death of Madhavrao II, Daulat Scindia had the fort and its surrounding region ceded to him. In 1797, he imprisoned Nana Phadanvis the Peshwa diplomat at Ahmednagar fort.
In 1803 during the Second Anglo-Maratha War, Arthur Wellesley defeated the Maratha forces and the East India Company came into possession of the fort. It was used by the British Raj as a prison and this was were Jawaharlal Nehru, Abul Kalam Azad, Sardar Patel and other members of Indian National Congress were jailed for almost three years after they passed the Quit India Resolution. Jawaharlal Nehru wrote his popular book -the Discovery of India- while he was imprisoned at Ahmednagar fort. During the same time, Congress leader, Moulana Abul Kalam Azad also compiled his acclaimed “Ghubar-i-Khatir” which is considered as the best example of “Epistolary Essays” in Urdu literature.
Currently the fort is under the administration of the Armoured Corps of the Indian Army
The Bagh Rauza-Ahmed Nizam Shah,the founder of Ahmednagar ,died in the beginning of the sixteenth century, and was buried half a mile noth- west of city. The Bagh Rauza,a fine black stone mausoleum with a domed roof, within which glitter inscriptions of gold from the Koran, enshrines the tomb of this founder and ‘faujdar’ of Ahmednagar.
One of the finest monuments in Ahmednagr, the Baugh Rauza,or the Garden of Shrine, is located just outside the western perimeter of the old city, near the Delhi Gate. The tomb is flanked by two other tombs. A stone monument nearby, is said to be the tomb of Ghulam Ali, a royal elephant who distinguished himself in the battle of Talikot against the Raja of Vijaynagar.in 1565, during the reign of the third Nizam Shah.
Devgad-Datta Temple,Devgad Tal. Newasa, Around the temple there is park with lots of tree ,there is Pravara river behind the temple. Boating is also available 70 Km away from Ahmednaga .It is on Nagar Aurangbad Road (Devgad Phata)
Tank Museum-Museum buffs in India might have heard of technological museums and Railway museums but only a few might have heard of the Cavalry Tank Museum of the Armoured Corps Centre and School, Ahmednagar, the first of its kind in Asia. The museum has a rich collection of tanks used during different periods. Indeed, what the ship is to the Navy and the airplane is to the Air Force, tank is to the Army. Former Army Chief (late) Gen BC Joshi-a tankman himself-inaugurated this museum in 1994.The earliest tanks-the British Mark I were used during World War I. Nicknamed Big Willie and fitted with a tractor engine, Mark-I was an effective weapon in battle because it could cross trenches and literally take the battle into the enemy camp. However the story of tank does not start there.At the turn of the 19th century, efforts were on to develop a mobile and protected platform for battle that could break the stalemate inherent in trench warfare. Trench warfare was known for its high rate of casualty quite unrelated to battle as many soldiers died from rampant disease in their armoured car. The museum traces the evolution of the modern-day tank using an assortment of displays like armoured cars, reconnaissance vehicles and light tanks. It has a model belonging to the class of armoured cars that General Dwyer used to enter Amritsar’s Jallianwala Bagh. In order to make it a true cross-country vehicle, the wheels of Armoured Cars were replaced with tracks around 1912-and then were provided with a turret-mounted gun for better firepower. Tanks played a pivotal role during the Second World War and both the Allies and the Axis Powers made sparkling advances in the development of the tank. Early tanks had their now-distinctive top-mounted main gun on the side in order to lower the centre of gravity and made the vehicle stable. Indeed, when the main gun was placed at the top in the British A9 models, the tank was wobbly enough to be nicknamed Matilda, after the comical duck. Matilda, apart from its many descendants, is a prized exhibit at the museum.The 1934 armoured car Schmerer Panzersphah Wagen (8-RAD) donning a ‘swastik’, a vital component of Adolf Hitler’s fleet, transports the visitors to the Nazi era of Europe. Also exhibited at the museum are the many variants of the tank that perform specialised services such as aircrew recovery, bridge laying, mine-detonation and dozing. The mine-detonating tank, for instance, uses a revolving drum of heavy chains called ‘flails’ to detonate anti-personnel landmines. It clears the path for troops to move on. Perhaps because of the versatility of the tank, soon anti-tank armour also began using tank-like concepts. Many howitzers and anti-tank guns were mounted on tank classes to give them mobility in the battlefield. Some of the models displayed in the museum were the mainstay of the Indian Army’s self-propelled artillery until recently. ‘Amphibious’ tanks shown in the museum were among those developed for the Normandy Landings during World War-II. Many of the tanks on display at the museum were originally German and Japanese tanks captured during World War II. Pakistani tanks like Chaffee, Walker-Bulldog and Patton that took part in 1965 and 1971 are were also on display here. The rest of the 40 tanks are vehicles that served the Indian Army’s Armoured Corps right from its earliest years. All stand as a mute testimony to the glorious tradition of the mechanised armour since World War I. Notable among the exhibits are the Stuart tank which was taken to record heights of 12000 feet at Zojila Pass in 1948 by the Indian Army’s 7th Cavalry and the British-make Centurion, nicknamed Pattonkiller and Bahadur. Patton was considered the hands of Indian troops. Many of the Patton tanks displayed in the museum (and elsewhere in India) are from the ‘Patton Graveyard’ in Bhikiwind village of the Khem-Karan sector in Punjab. With their guns kept in a lowered position, these tanks remind visitors of the exploits of the Indian Army. In fact, an Indian Centurion tank destroying a Pakistani Patton in 1971 lock, stock and-literally-barrel in the Sialkot sector so alarmed the US manufacturers of the tank that they came calling to check for possible snags. That particular Patton with a gaping hole in its gun turret is the jewel of the museum’s collection. The museum’s collection also includes Soviet-made T-54 which saw action in the 1971 Indo-Pak war and was the Army’s main battle tank for many years. A T-54 can persist in 18 ft depth of water using a snorkel and can also create its own smoke-screen. The Indian tank armour was part of the Allied operations in World War II. Since Independence, Indian tanks have been in action in Kashmir and Goa operations, in Chushul and Sela Pass during the Chinese aggression of 1962 and the Indo-Pak wars. The latest addition to the museum is the Army’s old warhorse, Vijayanta that played a key role in the 1971 war and is now being phased out from the Army. The museum also houses diverse cavalry memorabilia in its two Memory Halls and has two Model Rooms for automotive armament and electronic equipment. Heroes’ Gallery records the exploits of the braves of the Armoured Corps over the years. An interesting facility in the vicinity of the museum is the Tank Driving Simulator used to train tank drivers. The simulator mimics the roll, pitch and yaw of tanks driven over all kinds of terrain. Perhaps because of the versatility of the tank, soon anti-tank armour also began using tank-like concepts. Many howitzers and anti-tank guns were mounted on tank classes to give them mobility in the battlefield. Some of the models displayed in the museum were the mainstay of the Indian Army’s self-propelled artillery until recently. ‘Amphibious’ tanks shown in the museum were among those developed for the Normandy Landings during World War-II. Many of the tanks on display at the museum were originally German and Japanese tanks captured during World War II. Pakistani tanks like Chaffee, Walker-Bulldog and Patton that took part in 1965 and 1971 are were also on display here. The rest of the 40 tanks are vehicles that served the Indian Army’s Armoured Corps right from its earliest years. All stand as a mute testimony to the glorious tradition of the mechanized armour since World War I.
Notable among the exhibits are the Stuart tank which was taken to record heights of 12000 feet at Zojila Pass in 1948 by the Indian Army’s 7th Cavalry and the British-make Centurion,nicknamed Pattonkiller and Bahadur. Patton was considered the hands of Indian troops. Many of the Patton tanks displayed in the museum (and elsewhere in India) are from the ‘Patton Graveyard’ in Bhikiwind village of the Khem-Karan sector in Punjab. With their guns kept in a lowered position, these tanks remind visitors of the exploits of the Indian Army. In fact, an Indian Centurion tank destroying a Pakistani Patton in 1971 lock, stock and-literally-barrel in the Sialkot sector so alarmed the US manufacturers of the tank that they came calling to check for possible snags. That particular Patton with a gaping hole in its gun turret is the jewel of the museum’s collection. The museum’s collection also includes Soviet-made T-54 which saw action in the 1971 Indo-Pak war and was the Army’s main battle tank for many years. A T-54 can persist in 18 ft depth of water using a snorkel and can also create its own smoke-screen. The Indian tank armour was part of the Allied operations in World War II. Since Independence, Indian tanks have been in action in Kashmir and Goa operations, in Chushul and Sela Pass during the Chinese aggression of 1962 and the Indo-Pak wars.
The latest addition to the museum is the Army’s old warhorse, Vijayanta that played a key role in the 1971 war and is now being phased out from the Army. The museum also houses diverse cavalry memorabilia in its two Memory Halls and has two Model Rooms for automotive armament and electronic equipment. Heroes’ Gallery records the exploits of the braves of the Armoured Corps over the years.
An interesting facility in the vicinity of the museum is the Tank Driving Simulator used to train tank drivers. The simulator mimics the roll, pitch and yaw of tanks driven over all kinds of terrain.
Mohta Devi -Temple of Goddess Renuka, It is located in Pathardi, Taluka, 70 km away from Ahmednagar
Siddhtek-One of Ashtavinayaks, On the greatest mountain Siddhatek which is located on the bank of river Bhima & surrounded by forest and trees, It is located in Karjat Taluka
Mula Dam-The biggest Dam in Ahmednagar city. It is named as “Dnyaneshwarsagar Dam” Dam is constructed on the river ‘Mula’. The storage Capacity of Dam is 26 TMC. Drinking Water to Ahmednagar City comes through this Dam. The Command area of this dam is Rahuri, Newasa, Shevgaon & Pathardi taluka of Ahmednagar District. It is very near to Mahatma Phule Krishi Vidhyapeeth. Near the Dam there is a beautiful rest House Many tourist visit Dam site during the period of rainy season.
Bhandardara Dam- A big dam is constructed across the river Pravara at Bhandardara . Nearby are Randha falls. Bhandardara is hill station.It is in Taluka Akole Nearabout 170 km from Ahmednagar To reach – From Ahmednagar you have to go to Sangamner which is 110 Km and then from Sangamner to Akole which is near about 40 Km and from Akole towards Rajur which is near about 20 km .There is beautiful Umbrela Fall near the dam
Shirdi-Amongst the places of deep belief and faith in India, falls Shirdi – the place of Saint Sai Baba. The devotees and followers of Sai Baba are spread all over the world and hence the place has attained importance. A small village in Ahmedanagar district Shirdi ,has acquired a lot of fame & followers for Sant Shree Sai Baba.Sai Baba attained samadhi on Dassera day in 1918.Sai Baba preached at Shirdi all his life & renewned people’s faith in God.Devotees from every faith throng here all year round to pay their respects to his memory.Khandoba Mandir,Samadhi of Shree Sai Baba,Dwarkamai mosque,Mhasoba temple all these places are within a periphery of 1km & can be covered on foot.
The location Shirdi is located approximately 86 Kilometers from Ahmednagar, It is on Nagar-Mandmad Road, It is also connected by railways
Madhi-Samadhi place (grave) of Shri Kanifnatha one of the nine great nath persons.The Samadhi is in beatiful stones.The Yatra(pilgrimage) is observed during the festival of Holi to gudhipadva.The nomadic tribe-Gopal has enjoyes the honour of firing the sacred Holi at this place. The community courts of the tribes administered justice and solve the family disputes.The Bazar of Donkeys is held during the yatra .The Place Madhi is 51 Km away from Ahmednagar towards east. we can reach to Madhi from Nivdunge village on Nagar Pathardi road.
Vriddheshwar-The is a temple of Mahadeva in the beautiful deep valley. The place is in the area of village Ghatsiras, Taluka Pathardi. There is a approach from village Devrai on Nagar Pathardi Road. The Yatras on the occasion of Ashadi Ekadashi, shivratri are famous .The place is also famous for Aurvedic Plants.
Kalsubai and Harischandra Gad-
About Kalasubai
The peak of Kalasubai is situated in Nagar district. This is apex, highest peak of the mountain range of Sahyadri. It is a dream of every sincere mountaineer to climb it at least once. Its height is almost 5,500 feet.
The Legend
It is said, that in the ancient times, a lady named “Kalsu” came to nearby Indorey village to work. However, somebody forced her to clean utensils and clean up the residence by force. So she left the place and eventually died at this spot. So comes the name, Kalasubai. A small temple is built here, in her memory.
About the Sanctuary
The sanctuary area spreads from Kalasubai to Harischandragad in Akole Tehsil of Ahmednagar district. The area is part of Sahyadri hill ranges. The Kalsubai sanctuary is challenge to trekkers as it is most rugged, hilly area and difficult to get accessibility. Kalasubai is the highest (1646 m) peak of Western Ghats in Maharashtra. It is also a paradise for nature lovers. Flora
The vegetation type is southern moist mixed deciduous. The part of Sahyadri that is close to West Coast is semi evergreen forest and semi deciduous shrub savanna. The main tree species that are seen in this area are Hirda, Jambhul, Chandawa, Bahava, Kumbhal, Gulchavi, Kudal, Siras, Kharvel, Karap, Avali, Aashind, Lokhandi, Beheda and character worth noticing.
Species that are undergrowth are Mandar, Kadipatta, Ghaneri, Chilhar, Parjambhual, Karvi, Karwand, Ber, Dhaiti, and Rametha. There are large patches of grasslands mostly of Marvel, Dongari, Pawanya, Ber, Surad, Harali etc. You can also see Bamboo in this region but rarely. Fauna Tourists can find wide variety of mammals, reptiles and birds. The mammals found here are Leopard, Jungle cat, Palm civet, Mongoose, Hyena, Wolf, Jackal, Fox, Wild Boar, Barking Deer, Sambar, Hare, and Bats etc. The most attractive animals are Indian Giant Squirrel and Porcupine.
The reptiles found in this sanctuary are Monitor Lizard, Fan-Throated Lizard, Turtles and many species of snakes. Among the birds are the common hill and grass land birds. One can also spot water birds such as White Necked Storks, Black Ibis, Herons, Egrets, Cormorants, Water hen’s, etc.
Location: Akole Tehsil Of Ahmednagar District, Maharashtra,
Best Time To Visit-August To December
Additional information
Huge quantity of milk is collected in Ahmednagar district and is transported to other cities. Its proper and effective utilization should be made in the district itself. Sugarcane, Bajra and Jawar are grown in ample quantity. Sugarcane waste coming out of from sugar factories should be utilized for manufacturing Bio-coal briquettes, Card Boards, Particle Board etc. Establishment of Co-operative and Mini Industrial area in each taluka of Ahmednagar district will change the industrial scenario of the district.The Co-operative sugar industries, distilleries, paper mills, ginning and pressing mills, oil mills, dairy, agricultural and allied activities are predominant economic activities of the district.